Captain’s Log, 0210222.062

We are going to tinker for the remainder of February. At this point, I am 90% sure I want to launch a Kickstarter for Awesome Moments on March 15th, and spend March 1st throught he 15th building up to that.

In the mean time, today’s task is to implement radial menus in my RPG/Adventure game unity framework.

I spent yesterday relaxing, trying to avoid working on the game, even in my head, but I could not avoid the conclusion that I still hate adventure games, and unless I am suddenly struck by lightning and come up with a new way of approaching them, I’m just going to go ahead and start implementing battles as soon as my radial menu is up and running.

Let me try and give you a quick idea of my damage.

Suppose in your game, you have a puzzle. Collect the 7 shards of the Pearl of McGuffin. One of the shards is in a vending machine. It costs 25 cents.

You can see a quarter in a drain. So you stick a piece of chewing gum on a stick, and use it to fish the quarter out.

The glory and the failing of adventure games is this: That is a cool, clever way to solve the problem. But it is also highly specific. Most games won’t allow you to do that, because it cannot be generalized to the game’s built in mechanics. But adventure games have the opposite problem: they will allow you to do that, and nothing else.

My favorite thing about videogames is player expression. Adventure games have, by nature, zero player expression. Every puzzle solution is not the player applying his creativity and skill to the problem before him, but rather, the player thinking the game designer’s thoughts after him. I would rather there be a set of consistent mechanics, from which the player can derive the intended solution, but also create his own solutions.

One of the reasons I seldom discuss Candy Raid, a game I worked on as the artist, is it is a puzzle game. There is one and only one intended solution to each problem. I hate that in games. I hate games that do that. They are a legitimate genre, and some people love them, but not me.

My favorite game these days is Breath of the Wild, and the reason is simply this: The game has puzzles. The puzzles have intended solutions. But the game not only doesn’t prevent you from thinking outside the box and applying your own solutions, the designers kind of wink and nod and hint that they approve of you breaking out of their boxes.

The point and click adventure genre is a celebration of the box. Therefore, I cannot in good conscious make one unless I figure out a way to change that. Therefore, even though I could stop building my RPG framework a third of way in, and produce an adventure game with that third, and even though I should, simply because doing so will force me to find the fun in the non-battle parts of the engine and because it will mean I have more games to my name, at this present moment the plan is to not do that very thing.

I do not serve my customers well by trying to produce a game I will hate. Although…

Here’s a notion. I’m not committing to it. But let’s throw it out there and let if vibrate in the aether. If I make a stealth game with an RPG/adventure game interface, then I will go into my RPG with sneaking baked in.

Hm.

Anyway, radial menus.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s