Formats for Print and Screen

Social Media and Screens

  • The average computer screen or TV has a ratio of 16×9
  • Phones range all over, however, well over 1/3rd of them use some variant on 9×16, with the exceptions typically being longer.
  • However, 4×3 or 3×4 is also very common because tablets work better with a more square ratio. This is what iPad uses.
  • Twitter will not crop, but will display fully:
    • 1 16×9 picture
    • 2 8×9 pictures
    • 1 8×9 picture followed by 2 16×9 pictures
    • 4 (2×2) 16×9 pictures
  • 3 16×9 pictures stacked vertically fits neatly on:
    • The average phone screen
    • Facebook, if contained within a single larger image
    • A 5×8 print book with generous margins
  • 16×9 panels with 12-point text in a 5×8 book results in text that is still large enough to read clearly in a 2×2 grid of images on Twitter on mobile.
  • Therefore, Bunny Trail Junction is formatted as 3 16×9 panels, the first two of which may be joined into a single 8×9 panel (absorbing the gutter between them to make up the difference). Any of these two or three panels may be split vertically into two ‘sub-panels’ wherever I like. Although the format is so small, it seldom makes sense to do so anywhere but the center.
    • This is posted on Twitter as individual images plus an additional “Title Card” posted at the beginning of a 3-image set, or the end of a 2-image set.
    • This is posted as just the individual images on bunny-trail.com which, thanks to the webcomic WordPress theme I’m using, arranges the panels horizontally on desktop and vertically on mobile.
    • On Facebook, I found that uploading the pages meant for the print book had some irritating cropping, but was readable.
      • Ideally, I would export a separate, lower-resolution image that was less tall, to control the cropping myself, but at the time I judged the extra work was not enough benefit for the time.
      • Just prior to launching Bunny Trail Junction, I deleted my Facebook because they were getting extra-specially Stasi.
    • None of these formats works well for Gab. I think assembling the 2×2 grid I post on Twitter, but as a single image, might work for Gab, but as I rarely go there, I have not yet tested it.
    • Instagram is supposed to be the place for images, but every time I consider starting an account, I have turned away for some reason.
  • My first print book was 8.5×11 because that’s as big as Amazon KDP lets me go.
    • I stopped making them that big because it felt wrong that my books were larger than Dr. Seuss’s.
      • However, reading a biography of Seuss killed my reverence for him. I may not yet be on his level, but I no longer care if my books are bigger than his.
    • Big books with big illustrations are great. Why wouldn’t I want kids to have bigger pictures?
    • However, ideally, I would create my drawings even larger than the final pages
      • Consumer tools are not well-suited to going larger than 8.5×11
        • I do have a printer that prints and scans 11×17
        • The paper types available at that size are either poorly suited to take ink drawings, or else too heavy for my printer to process well.
        • My standard workflow of sketching digitally at low-res, printing the sketch big, refining by hand and inking, and then scanning in, is still poorly suited to available equipment.
        • But I do have a light table that might fill the gaps once I clear out the Den.
        • More testing is required.
      • KDP’s Hardcover formats have one that is physically 8.5×11, but the pages inside are slightly narrower.
  • Amazon KDP is geared towards 6×9 and tries to push you towards it.
    • Most of my books are 6×9
    • My 11×17 scanner/printer makes my workflow quite well optimized for 6×9 work.
    • Bigger pictures would be nicer, but 6×9 isn’t bad
  • 5×8 is the smallest KDP will go
    • 5×8 does, just barely, fit into my pockets, but calling it a pocket book is a terrible stretch.
    • 5×8 it well-suited to holding 3 16×9 images on a single page.
    • KDP has a dedicated 5×8 hardcover format.
  • 8×9 is one half of 16×9, and therefore a single two-page spread of an 8×9 book would be one ‘screen’ in size or one ‘panel’ in the Bunny Trail Junction 3-Panel format.
    • 8×9 is a weird size. Some printers won’t do it.
      • This is an important consideration. If a publisher I want to work with is doing print runs instead of POD, 8×9 is not impossible, but may complicate matters.
      • KDP certainly won’t do it hardcover.
      • But they will do it paperback.
      • The first bulk POD comic printer I’ve looked at will do 8×9! And hardcover! We’re looking at $4.50 a book perfect-bound softcover, full color, or $11.52 per book hardcover, assuming my usual 30-ish pages. That’s assuming a small bulk order, unlike the single-issue POD of KDP (these will be intrinsically more expensive).
    • Prototyping a 2-page spread of 8×9, a prototype for a portion of a kids’ book, would work as an episode of Bunny Trail Junction. Or as a “Hit for the Eye-buds”
    • A 2-page spread of 8×9 would fit on 11×17 paper, albeit only just. If I want to work bigger than my final size, I still have the tech hurdles I have with 8.5×11 books.
    • You could fit 4 16×9 panels on two pages, though the read order would be unclear, and the panels would be hyuuuge.
      • Conversely, you could fit one 8×9 four-panel comic per page, the read-order would be fine, and the panels would be a more traditional newspaper comic ratio
        • This would post fine on Twitter as a second image with an 8×9 title card.
        • This would probably post fine on Gab by itself.
        • This would probably post fine on Facebook by itself.
        • I have no data for Instagram.
        • Ideally, the panels would display 4×1 on Desktop and 2×2 on mobile, but I can’t yet predict that.
        • Actually, yes I can. I can do a makeshift comic using my Inktobers. BRB.
          • Toocheke likes to do 3 panels in one row, and 1 in the last in Desktop mode, but on Mobile it stacks them vertical, and you can see 1 whole panel and most of the second on my phone (which is taller than 16×9) Not optimal, but I can live with it.
    • For projects with people making comic books and manga, I will probably favor comic book and manga sizes, in accordance with the sort of thing that is being created. However, I need to make at least one 8×9 book, and I suspect that will be my format of choice going forward.

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