Digging into my Slip Box

So, I’ve been sort-of-kind-of bullet journaling, except on blank playing cards. The same ones I use in my Zettelkasten. And then indexing the cards in a manner like unto the zettelkasten.

Hilariously, even though when I took to Bullet-Journaling™ and realized I could combine techniques from Smart-Noting™, the idea to dip back into my deck and see how my current thought meshes with lessons from my past didn’t occur to me.

But last night, I started reading Not All Fairy Tales Have Happy Endings, and today I decided since I was going to consolidate my notes from that and decide how I would proceed with my Candy Raid sequel from there, I figured I might as well break out the Zettelkasten itself and see how it all worked out.

And well I did. I have learned several lessons in the past that I was ignoring. As well as several lessons I learned recently As well as several lessons I learned recently AND in the past.

Here are a handful of lessons I decided I need to be daily reminded of. Some are good advice in general, others are tailored to my specific personality and style, and are probably bad advice for people who are not very similar to me.

  • SAY WHY. Even to children. Even to yourself. Nobody is motivated without a WHY.
  • COMMIT strongly but rarely, and CUT your losses swiftly when your gut says to do so.
  • PROVOKE yourself to action with challenges. Race the clock. Make bets with yourself.
  • The correct challenge is seldom the easy one. CHOOSE the challenge with the right amount of meaning and awesomeness.

So, heck with it. I’mma make a JRPG. Not an adventure game, we’re gonna get the combat right in. And instead of tinkering with a property I’m apathetic about, I’m breaking out the Naval Navel herself, the Girl Goblin, my wife’s favorite of my past creations, Wren Valen, the Flying Privateer!

“Wait, did she magically become a redhead halfway through?”

Yes. Hollywood has decided to blackwash all the gingers, and I have decided in return to gingerwash every one of my own characters whose hair and skin color is inessential to the character. This is why John Michael Jones, who is supposed to be a bog-average boy, is a redhead instead of having brown hair.

Obviously Jump the Shark is a shark, and Sera Mermaid was already published as a blonde. Most of my characters cannot be ginger for one reason or another. But those what can, are. And Wren can.

Allons-y!

Concept singularity

26 projects currently listed in Yet Another List of Projects.

John Michael Jones is on the verge of being added to the Alpha Test/Demake not as a skit playing out within the demake…

Which has been under consideration

..but as a focal point of the conceit.

So, we are taking Alpha Test, and merging it with AV@TAR, Crossover Arcade, Jump the Shark, Piqha, Stardogs, Star Knights, AND Theria… and we’re almost at a functioning gestalt.

I just need to cook this stone soup a few minutes longer.

Dr. Eli Stump

Dr. Stump is the foremost expert on therians. He was well prepared for this life by his extensive life making Starnet videos detailing crazy theories about peak media franchises well before he got aboard the sleeper ship headed for Theria, and he doesn’t really care who knows it.

Old Sentinels say that once upon a time, Dr. Stump was a formidable man. That he’s let himself go in the past few years. But Dr. Stump does not talk about the glory days. He talks about therians. And if there’s something you need to know about therians, he almost certainly already knows it.

Drams Æther

Æther is measured in drams, which are also the unit of currency in many lands where the substance is harvested and used in various machinations. The units are as follows. Four drams (4ᵭ) to the nip. 3 nips (3ꬻ) to the gil (1ꬶ). 1ꬶ of aether is about a teacupfull liquid radiant. Dram coins frequently (depending on the local culture) have an aether crystal set in the coin itself, whereas larger denominations of coins are theoretically exchangeable for aether. Seximal and duodecimal denominations are normal for other currencies.

Of course, a 1 gil aether stone may be worth considerably more or considerably less depending on the intensity and nature of the radiance stored therein and on market forces.

Progress Report 0210115.065

The plan has not been panning out at all. But I have not been without progress.

I’ve begun storyboards for a pocket bestiary that meshes with my virtual pet, and gone ahead and mocked up the title page.

It’s designed for Amazon’s tiny 5×8 format, and frankly, I’m half-inclined to make it black and white, even though I’ve gone and colored the title spread.

You can see designs changing in realtime across the pages, and that’s because I added a hatchling stage before my previously existing hatchling stage, because the Digimon virtual pet convinced me that was a good idea. Frankly, my plan for this book is to go one bestiary ahead before finalizing it. That is, book 1 will be the core monsters, mostly represented by this graphic:

This set hits all your fantasy creature needs. You got your basic dragon, your basic orc, your basic rock monster, your basic wizard. It could use some tweaking, but that’s the purpose.

Set 2, and book 2, will fill out the ecosystem somewhat, with plants, bugs, birds, fish, and elementals. Each of the sets interacts with all the others — there will be common evolutions between later monsters and earlier ones. So my thought is: storyboard bestiary 1, storyboard bestiary 2, produce bestiary 1, storyboard bestiary 3, produce bestiary 2, and so forth, so that each bestiary gets a little bit of love from hindsight. And since I have Hat Trick 1 and Awesome Moments 1 storyboarded, that means I’ll likely not produce this book until next year at the earliest. But there you are.

I shall dedicate a future post to the bestiary. My thoughts on it as a product, and so on.

On Vargenstone… Eh.

I did do final quality work on the south-facing standing and walking torso and head.

I’ve discovered I need to double the size of the source graphic and use the GDQuest pencil to achieve the line quality I want. No big deal. And I can occupy myself for hours polishing the graphics up to this level if I choose. But I haven’t been able to get momentum going on it.

I haven’t followed the plan at all. I suppose I could still ‘redeem’ the plan by spending all day today and a hefty chunk of tomorrow solely on Vargenstone, but I’m not deeply interested in in trying to retrieve failed plans. I’m more interested in the question of “why did it fail, is there something I can do that wouldn’t fail, and am I willing to do that?”

Whatta Monster Do

Pokémon is, in general a well-tuned game. It is about collecting. It’s second biggest feature was exploring, at least until the hallway simulators starting Gen 4/5ish, and this meshes extremely well with collecting. Find new places, add to your collection. The combat system is Ultimate Rock Paper Scissors, with a complex elemental strength/weakness graph — and this also tests your collecting skills. You want a team of monsters that has good coverage of elemental strengths and situations.

I have some serious disagreements with Mr. Masuda on what makes Pokémon work; Pokémon has been letting the difficulty of its combat and the richness of its exploration wither on the vine, and at the same time has been half-assing some virtual pet functionality in. And I feel this undercuts what made a Pokémon player feel connected to his monsters, even while slapping a hasty bandaid over it. But the core of collecting is still there, and the rest of the gameplay still orbits around that core.

Digimon, on the other hand, was a virtual pet. The point was not to catch them all, but to raise them well. I’ve been test driving a Digimon 20th Anniversary pet to see what I want to steal, ditch, or improve for my V Pet, and… hm.

Here’s some groob animations while I ponder.

Continue reading “Whatta Monster Do”

Status Report 0210111.054: Trying something new

This week instead of taking Sunday and Wednesday off, and working on my own projects on my days off, I aim to take a different route:

Sunday day of total rest.

Monday through Wednesday, Vargenstone

Thursday through Saturday, Therian VPet.

Today, unfortunately, I’ve misspent my peak creative hours. So, rather than trying to do the theoretically optimal thing (build an orc animation), I’m going to switch over to a task that requires skill rather than creativity: creating final-quality versions of the dwarf animations that exist thus far. Tomorrow, I aim to be back on the “Minimum Viable Product” train, working to bring the Orc to life. Assuming that goes well, Wednesday’s task will be to master alternate costumes for the Dwarf.

Thursday morning or Wednesday evening, we will change gears, examining how well we did on Vargenstone, and laying out our objectives for Theria.